Sunday, July 5, 2020

Five Years Ago We United With Our Brothers And Sisters In Detroit: By Flint Activist and Purple Walrus Press Contributor Melissa Mays.


5 Years Ago we united with our sisters and brothers in Detroit and cities all over Michigan fighting against water contamination, water shutoffs, lack of access to clean & affordable water and sanitation and the Emergency Manager Law to kick off the Detroit to Flint Water Justice Journey!! 70 miles in 7 days stopping along the cities hardest hit by these austerity policies to share, plan and stand together to fight against the Profit Over People mentality that affects all of our lives... I am still SO PROUD of what we have accomplished.

Thursday, July 2, 2020

Governor Whitmer Shuts Down Indoor Bar Service: Effects of Order On some Ypsilanti Establishments.

SideTrack Bar and Grill Depot Ypsilanti Thursday afternoon. Photo Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.


By Editor In Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

On Wednesday Governor Whitmer issued an executive order stipulating that indoor bar service be shut down throughout most of the state of  Michigan due to a recent increase of COVID-19 cases. The order applies to licensed establishments that earn more than 70% of gross receipts from  the sale of alcohol. So what does this mean for local Ypsilanti establishments? It means that some of your favorites places are affected and some not so much. Here's a look at a few Ypsilanti establishments.

The Tap Room located on Michigan Avenue in downtown Ypsilanti announced Thursday that service at the establishment is no longer feasible. According to a statement on Tap Room's facebook page, "Due to the increased number of COVID 19 cases in Michigan, the new state service mandate no longer renders service at the Tap Room feasible for both the health of our staff and customers or the business as a whole in it's current capacity."

Over at Maiz Cantina located in Ypsilanti's Depot town, management announced that they have decided to pause inside seating temporarily. Maiz stated Thursday that they will operate with patios only for the foreseeable future. Maiz encourages customers to order carryout. According to Maiz, "In the current climate with holiday travel and rising COVID 19 cases we think this is the safest way forward right now."

 Long time Ypsilanti Depot Town establishment Sidetrack Bar and Grill announced Wednesday that barstools have been removed from both bars out of extreme caution for guests and staff which provides for greater social distancing in order to keep staff and customers safe. According to Sidetrack, "We have tons of great outside and inside spaced-out seating.

The Wurst Bar located on Cross Street in Ypsilanti made clear in a statement that their business is less than 50% alcohol sales and that they rely heavily on food coming from their kitchen. According to The Wurst Bar, "We will continue to maintain strict social distancing in our indoor seating, and continue to require all guests to wear a mask and to respect boundaries we have established."

The popular Bobcat Bonnie's located on Michigan Avenue in downtown Ypsi responded to the governor's new order by clarifying that they continue to be open for business. According to management, "Be kind, spread the word, wear your mask, and we will make sure you have an excellent time with us!"


Photos Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.


Expanded seating outside of Maiz in Depot Town in Ypsilanti Thursday afternoon.
Depot Town Ypsilanti Thurday.

Tuesday, June 30, 2020

Restaurant Seating Expansion Ypsilanti Changes Downtown Dining Landscape...In Very Cool Way.

Photo Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.

By Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

Everywhere you look these days signs of change are evident in the age of COVID 19. In downtown Ypsilanti restaurateurs are adapting to the pandemic by initiating seating expansion into downtown streets. What does the expanded seating look like? Well, frankly, it looks pretty cool. Seating expansion into the street at Beezy's Cafe on N. Washington Street and Bobcat Bonnie's at the corner of Michigan Avenue and Washington looks inviting and fun. Of particular interest in front of Bobcat Bonnie's would be the intriguing looking round pod-like framed structures poised on the street on Washington. Hmm.Very intriguing indeed.

If you want to check out the new awesome outdoor restaurant seating in downtown Ypsi, head on down!

Photos Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.

In front of Bobcat Bonnie's at corner of Michigan Ave and N. Washington Tuesday afternoon.
Expanded seating in front of Beezy's on N. Washington Tuesday afternoon.

Sunday, June 28, 2020

Mr. Trump, I Wear A Mask To Protect People I Care About: By Purple Walrus Press Contributor Melissa Mays of Flint.


Mr. Trump,

I wear a mask to protect the people I care about and people I don't know. I wear a mask because I could be carrying a virus and not know it and I do not want to accidentally transmit it to someone even more vulnerable than me. I wear a mask because I have a compromised immune system so symptoms showed up differently for my body. I wear a mask because MY PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN recommends it. I don't listen to you or give a DAMN how you feel about my mask. You are NOT A DOCTOR nor are you the center of the universe, you ignorant, self-absorbed, narcissistic toad. My mask and I DO NOT CARE ABOUT YOUR FEELINGS OR YOUR POLITICS, Mr. Trump, and neither does the virus. I live in a poisoned community where science, caution and concern for others FAR outweighs your personal, unprofessional and immature feelings and opinions.
GROW. UP. This is NOT about you, no matter how hard you want it to be. It's about protecting the people you have systematically failed.
Shame on you.

Thursday, June 25, 2020

Former Michigan Governor Rick Snyder Will Be Questioned today About the Flint Water Crisis, And Specifics Regarding the Mass Lead Contamination of My hometown.



Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

Former Michigan governor Rick Snyder will be questioned today about what he knew regarding the Flint water crisis that has gripped my hometown since 2014. In today's deposition, Snyder will be asked about questions relating to what he knew about the horrific contamination of the drinking water in the city of Flint. He is going to be asked the specifics regarding the mass lead contamination of an entire city's drinking water.

The deposition relates to civil lawsuits filed on behalf of over a dozen Children in Flint. Former Governor Snyder has not answered any questions about the the Flint Water Crisis in over four years.

The water crisis began in 2014 when the City of Flint decided to change the source of the city's drinking water in order to save money. The Flint River became the new source of water, however, the water was not correctly treated. The corrosive water began to strip the lead from the city's lead water pipes and soon the poisonous lead riddled water made it's way into Flint homes, contaminating the tap and bath water. The water for 100,000 Flint residents became contaminated at severely hazardous levels.

The deposition began at 9 a.m Thursday morning.

On The Flint Water Crisis: By Purple Walrus Press Contributor and Flint Activist Melissa Mays.

Downtown Flint. Photo Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.

Ok, it is June 2020. The #FlintWaterCrisis began 2,245 days ago and it has been in international news since 2015... Yet, I was tagged in a thread where people are saying that Whitmer shouldn't have the power to put forth Executive Orders for safety relating to COVID-19 and in the same breath praise former Governor Snyder and SOMEHOW it is OUR FAULT that Snyder, under his forced Emergency Manager Law, took unilateral control over our water, switched the source, refused to properly treat it and then lie & cover it up as innocent people died. APPARENTLY it's NOT OK to put orders in to try to tackle a pandemic BUT it's PERFECTLY OK to put orders in that poison and kill people.
NOW, these same soulless, ignorant people were also parroting the same old, tired, debunked lies from 2014 & 2015.

Wednesday, June 24, 2020

Parola Perspective In Brief: Anti-Intellectualism in American: By PWP Contributor Brooks Parola.



While anti-intellectualism has been a part of American culture for some time, I’m beginning to think that they’ve actually won.
Scientists and experts in almost every field are under attack like never before, and from all sides. And too many people seem to be far more interested in their right to spread misinformation than for standing up for people who’ve spent much of their adult lives becoming experts in their field. Whether it’s anti-fact, anti-science conservatives, or crazy conspiracy theorists across the political spectrum, the experts are constantly being attacked and undermined.

Tuesday, June 23, 2020

Ypsilanti Mayor Beth Bashert Announces Her Resignation Tuesday Morning, June 23.

Beth Bashert.

Editor In Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.
This is the resignation statement from Ypsilanti Mayor Beth Bashert that was posted on her facebook page at approximately 9:48 AM Tuesday, June 23.

It has been an honor to serve Ypsilanti in the ways I have, including city council member and mayor. I love Ypsilanti. Full Stop.
I am deeply sorry to have my service end on this note and in this way. Sadly, as a result of my actions, there is healing to do to ensure that all residents, including Black, Indigenous, and people of color, enjoy full equity in Ypsilanti. That is what I want for our City. I had hoped to participate in that healing process, going forward.
My family and friends have their own values, actions, and worlds. Please treat them as individuals and do not include them in your responses. This is on me and me alone.
To the many professionals, organizations, regional partners, and skilled community organizers that I worked with during my brief tenure, it was a privilege to work with you and I hope your work is successful and transformative.
Please accept my resignation as mayor, effective at 9 AM June, 23, 2020

Monday, June 22, 2020

Demonstrators Demand the Resignation of Ypsilanti Mayor Beth Bashert In Demonstration In Front Of Ypsilanti City Hall Monday / After March, group Splinters Off and Heads to Mayor's House for Second Protest.

Photo Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.


By Editor In Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

Many residents in Ypsilanti are angry with Ypsilanti Mayor Beth Bashert after she made statements  that were in her words, "biased", during a June16 City Council meeting. On Monday, June 22, approximately 200 protesters gathered in a demonstration in front of Ypsilanti City Hall demanding that Bashert resign from office. The demonstrators were peaceful, but intent on their demands that the Mayor Bashert resign immediately.

Several speakers addressed the protesters including Survivors Speak Executive Director and demonstration organizer Trische Duckworth, Nate Frazier, Bryan Robert Foley, Mayor Pro-Tem Lois Richardson, City Council members, Nicole Brown, Anthony Morgan, Annie Somerville and Steve Wilcoxen. After the speakers addressed the demonstrators, protesters marched down Huron Street and into Riverside Park. After marching through the park, the demonstrators wrapped up the march back in front of City Hall at the corner of Michigan Ave and Huron street. Councilperson Nicole Brown stated that Basherts behaviors continued after previous discussions and that, "I didn't expect to hear a mayor say she was a racist."

Just as the protest ended around 5:45 PM, there was a sudden twist when a group of approximately 50 protesters splintered off from the original Survivors Speak protest/march. This group of protesters marched west on Michigan Ave through downtown Ypsilanti and headed for the Mayor's home in Ypsilanti's Normal Park neighborhood. Once the protesters assembled themselves in front of Mayor Bashert's home, the crowd began chanting, " You are about to lose your job."

Several demonstrators spoke to the crowd of protesters. One protester stated that the mayor has dis-honored the office and needs to resign. Another speaker added that the mayor is a racist and an ageist.

The situation began on Wednesday evening when Ypsilanti Mayor Beth Bashert posted a lengthy apology for making what she called "A biased statement" at a June 16 Ypsilanti City Council meeting. Wednesday night an audio recording of the City Council meeting was made available on a Ypsilanti facebook page. Bashert can be heard stating the comments that she apologized for Wednesday night. According to audio of the June 16 Ypsilanti City Council meeting Bashert stated,  "Since I will be crucified if I vote against any black person on any commission, I will vote yes." Later in the recording, when a council person asks Bashert to apologize for her statement, Bashert replies, "Thank you. I will consider your comments."

Reaction to the Mayors comments have been swift and angry, as many local residents are demanding Bashert's immediate resignation. City Council members Nicole Brown and Annie Somerville have stated publicly that they will not participate in any other city council meetings until Basherts resigns.

All photos Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.

Ypsilanti Mayor Pro-Tem Lois Richardson.
Nicole Brown Ypsilanti City Council.
Protesters gather in front of Mayor Bashert's Home Monday.

Saturday, June 20, 2020

Approximately 1000 Protesters Participate In Black Lives Matter Protest & March in Ypsilanti Saturday.

Photo Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.


By Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

As temperatures soared into the 90's, approximately 1000 protesters participated in a Black Lives Matter protest and march Saturday afternoon in downtown Ypsilanti. The protest was organized in the wake of the killing of George Floyd by a white Minneapolis police officer on May 25. Protest organizer Ayanna Bennett asked prior to the protest that the public come out and support Black Lives Matter and demand justice.

Several speakers addressed the crowd of protesters Saturday from the steps of the Ypsilanti Public Library. Speakers included organizer Ayanna Bennett and Congresswoman Debbie Dingell. While addressing the crowd who gathered on Michigan Avenue, Dingell stated, "We have to have hope and this is the moment. If not now, when?"

At approximately 3:30 pm, protesters began marching through the streets of downtown Ypsilanti. Demonstrators marched north on Washington Street before heading west on Cross, and down Hamilton. As marchers approached the intersection of Hamilton and Michigan Avenue, the protesters turned right on Michigan Avenue and marched to the Ypsilanti Police station. As hundreds of protesters sat down on the grounds of the police station, several organizers addressed the crowd from the front doors of the police station.

Tensions grew as one organizer demanded that a black police officer have a discussion with her in the street in front of the station. Moments later, organizers called on and confronted Ypsilanti Police Chief Diguisti and engaged him in a tense conversation in the street in the middle of the crowd of demonstrators. According to a demonstrator who was in close proximity to the heated discussion between Chief Diguisti and organizers, the organizers wanted DeGuisti to take the microphone and address the crowd. According the protester, DeGiusti stated that he did not want to take the mic, but agreed with the protest organizers. Purple Walrus Press cannot confirm the contents of the heated discussion. PWP was given this information from a demonstration participant.

By 5:00 PM, the protesters headed back down Michigan Avenue where the demonstration wrapped up.

All photos by Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.

Ypsilanti Police Chief DeGuisti confronted by protesters.

Ypsilanti police officers abruptly leave the scene in front of police station as tension mounted.
Michigan Congresswoman Debbie Dingell.


Friday, June 19, 2020

Eastern Michigan University Police Department Bike Rodeo Coming In August.


Photo Purple Walrus Press.

By Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

The annual Eastern Michigan University Police Department Bike Rodeo is coming up soon and if you are a kid, and you love bikes, you are going to have blast! Not only are you going to receive free cool stuff, but you will learn the rules of the road, practice your bike skills and learn important bike safety. Also included will be a free safety check. Food and drink will be provided, also!

The event will take place at Gene Butman Ford located at 2105 Washtenaw Avenue in Ypsilanti. The event will be from 9 AM until 12 PM on August 1st.

See you there!

Thursday, June 18, 2020

Protest Calling For the Resignation of Ypsilanti Mayor Bashert Planned For Monday: Mayor Apologizes For Statement Made At City Council Meeting.

By Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

There will be a protest calling for the resignation of Ypsilanti Mayor Beth Bashert on Monday, June 22 in Ypsilanti. The protest is being organized by the group Survivors Speak.

Wednesday evening, Ypsilanti Mayor Beth Bashert posted a lengthy apology for making what she called "A biased statement" at a June 16 Ypsilanti City Council meeting. Wednesday night an audio recording of the city council meeting was made available on a Ypsilanti facebook page. Bashert can be heard stating the comments that she apologized for Wednesday night. According to audio of the June 16 Ypsilanti City Council meeting Bashert stated,  "Since I will be crucified if I vote against any black person on any commission, I will vote yes." Later in the recording, when a council person asks Bashert to apologize for her statement, Bashert replies, "Thank you. I will consider your comments."

The protest calling for the resignation of Ypsilanti Mayor Beth Bashert will take place on Monday, June 22 at 4PM - 6PM. 1 South Huron Street in Ypsilanti.

Additional information about the protest a found Here

Below is the June 17 apology posted on Bashert's facebook page.

Last night at City Council, I made a biased statement and voted based on that statement. Then I compounded the whole thing by digging in and getting defensive when questioned. All of those actions were racist. I am deeply ashamed and saddened that I did this. I have spent the time since that meeting feeling remorse, shame, and anger at myself.
I understand that none of the terrible feelings I am having at this time come close to the painful experiences Black and Brown people suffer due to racism.
Recently, City Council declared that Racism is a Public Health Issue which impacts everyone. As a white person, unfortunately, I am a racist person because I was raised in a racist culture and because I am an imperfect human being. I care deeply about confronting racism, yet that does not mean that I am not racist. I am trying to confront racism in myself.
I am committed to learning in public and sometimes that entails making mistakes in public. I have made a number of mistakes around race and racism while being mayor. I am grateful for the patience I have received, the teaching that others have provided, and I strive to learn something from each mistake. And I have gone on to make entirely NEW mistakes in public, inevitably.
I continue to take action to educate myself about racism. As a leader, I have helped raise the issue of race in local, state and national interviews and conversations. When the COVID Pandemic put a spotlight on race inequities and disparities in our local and national communities, I acted to protect the residents of the community I represent. As part of that work, I have shown up, donated, written proclamations, endorsed and supported candidates, marched in demonstrations, built friendships across race lines, consulted folks across race lines for solutions, encouraged projects that will help Ypsilanti’s Black community, voted to support progressive actions that target racism, and more. These actions are a sign of my good intent.
I hope that my actions have been better than my words, as I join with others in the fight to end racism. My actions have not been perfect, by far, and I continue to learn.
Last night, I was defensive and frustrated and caused harm as a result. I harmed my fellow council members, especially Mayor Pro Tem Lois Richardson, Nicole Brown, and Anthony Morgan. I harmed City Manager McMullan.
I deeply regret my words and I apologize. I desire to work to repair my relationships with Council members. I hope that these individuals and the community can see their way through to offering me forgiveness, as I seek to do better. But I understand that it is my task alone to tackle.

I am committed to continuing to show up, to learn to be a better ally, and join in the work to end systemic racism. I hope to earn back your respect and I’m grateful for any opportunity to benefit from your help in doing so. I thank you for your kind attention.

Wednesday, June 17, 2020

Black Lives Matter Demonstration, March, Lie-In Held In Ann Arbor Wednesday.

Photo Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.


By Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

Approximately one-hundred demonstrators participated in a Black Lives Matter protest, march and lie in Wednesday in downtown Ann Arbor. The protest began on the Diag located on the University of Michigan campus at noon.

The demonstration and march demanded justice in wake of the police killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis on May 25 at the hands of a white officer. The protest also addressed a violent incident that occurred in Ypsilanti Township last month when a black Ypsilanti Township woman was hit several times in the face by a white Washtenaw County Sheriff's Department officer. The incident has been viewed by many as an act of police brutality. The violent incident occurred in the Apple Ridge neighborhood in Ypsi Township.

Organizers of today's protest stated that the Washtenaw County Prosecutor's office, along with the Sheriff's office, have participated in (alleged and blatant) misconduct regarding the Ypsilanti Township incident. According to protest organizers, "We must hold these elected officials accountable. We must keep fighting for change. We will forever fight for change."

The rally on the UM Diag featured several several speakers, including co-demonstration organizer Trische Duckworth, Washtenaw County Prosecutor candidate Eli Savit, and Sustainability Commissioner at City of Ypsilanti, Bryan Robert Foley.

After several speakers addressed the crowd on the Diag, protesters marched into downtown Ann Arbor marching on State Street, to Liberty and over to the intersection of South Main and Huron. At the intersection of Main and Huron, marchers staged a lie-in in the street in front of the Washtenaw County Courthouse in order to bring attention to what protesters view as police misconduct.

All photos Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.

Demonstration co-organizer Trische Duckwoth.
Washtenaw County Prosecutor candidate Eli Savit on left. 

Saturday, June 13, 2020

Black Lives Matter/Prosecutorial Misconduct Must End Now Protest Ann Arbor June 17.



By Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

There will be a Black Lives Matter/Prosecutorial Misconduct Must End Now protest in Ann Arbor on Wednesday, June 17. The protest will take place on the Diag on the University of Michigan campus in downtown Ann Arbor at noon.

Demonstration organizers stated that the Washtenaw County Prosecutor's Office, along with the Sheriff's Office, have participated in (alleged and blatant) misconduct. According to a statement from protest host, Survivor's Speak, "We must hold these elected officials accountable! We must keep fighting for change! We will forever fight for change!"

Friday, June 12, 2020

For People Upset About Calls To "Defund the Police." By Purple Walrus Press Contributor and Flint Activist Melissa Mays.






For people who are upset about calls to "Defund the police," please read this article before getting upset. It seems certain media outlets <cough>FOX<cough> and others are muddying the waters as per usual.

Note: The following paragraph in quotes is from an article published in Thecut.com
"What does it mean to defund the police?

Defunding the police does not necessarily mean getting rid of the police altogether. Rather, it would mean reducing police budgets and reallocating those funds to crucial and oft-neglected areas like education, public health, housing, and youth services. (Some activists want to abolish the police altogether; defunding is a separate but connected cause.) It’s predicated on the belief that investing in communities would act as a better deterrent to crime by directly addressing societal problems like poverty, mental illness, and homelessness — issues that advocates say police are poorly equipped to handle, and yet are often tasked with. According to some estimates, law enforcement spends 21 percent of its time responding to and transporting people with mental illnesses. Police are also frequently dispatched to deal with people experiencing homelessness, causing them to be incarcerated at a disproportionate rate."


A good example is that in Flint, we have people without running water, without safe water, without FOOD or medical care or a place to live. But for SOME DAMN REASON, we have a $658,000 anti-mine tank. I'm FAIRLY certain that poison water, starving, homelessness, lack of quality healthcare and running water IN A PANDEMIC is more of a threat to Flint residents than MINES. Defunding the police is simply talking about putting OUR money where it will help us the most and I'm sorry, tanks are not it.


Contributed to Purple Walrus Press by Melissa Mays of Flint.

Thursday, June 11, 2020

Black Lives Matter Protest Saturday, June 20th In Ypsilanti.


By Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

In wake of the killing of George Floyd by a Minneapolis police officer on May 25, 2020, there will be a Black Lives Matter protest in downtown Ypsilanti on Saturday, June 20. The protest will be held from 2PM until 5 PM.

According to organizers, the protest will be peaceful and support Black Lives Matter. The demonstration will demand justice. Organizers stated that they are wearing BLM attire or all black. It is requested that participants arrive at the parking lot behind Puffer Reds on Michigan Ave in downtown Ypsilanti. The protest will end in Depot Town.

Wednesday, June 10, 2020

Congresswoman Dingell Recognizes COVID-19's Disproportional Impact on Environmental Justice Communities.


Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

According to a press release from the office of Congresswoman Debbie Dingell,  Congresswoman  Dingell (D-MI) and the Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change held a hearing on the relationship between frontline communities of color and low-income families and the disproportionate exposures to environmental pollution and effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to the statement, Dingell highlighted the need to ensure water affordability protections for households during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the CDC, one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19 is to wash one’s hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Prior to this crisis, though, an estimated 15 million people in the United States had experienced a water shutoff, especially in communities with higher rates of poverty, unemployment, and people of color.

“COVID-19 did not create a water crisis, it exacerbated an existing one,” said Dingell. “Access to clean water is a basic human right and is necessary for proper hygiene and safety during a national emergency—especially a pandemic that requires us to stay in our homes. Prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2016, a nationwide assessment of water shutoffs for non-payment revealed that an estimated 15 million people in the United States experienced a water shutoff, a shocking 1 out of every 20 households.” This according to the press release.

Dingell continued, “This has been a particular focus of mine during this crisis and, in April, Rep. Rashida Tlaib and I introduced legislation to prohibit water shutoffs and provide rate payer assistance. As many states now begin the process of phased in re-openings and lifting existing moratoriums on water shutoffs, this bill has become more important than ever because this crisis is not over. COVID-19 still remains a serious threat to public health. We still have no vaccine for COVID-19 and in some state we are seeing cases rising again.” According to the statement from Dingells office.

Dingell, Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib (D-MI), and more than 60 members of Congress introduced the Emergency Water is a Human Right Act, which would prohibit water shutoffs nationwide and provide financial assistance for low-income households to pay for drinking water and wastewater during the COVID-19 national emergency. The Emergency Water is a Human Right Act was included in the House-passed Heroes Act.

Monday, June 8, 2020

Parola Perspective In Brief: Don't Overreach: By Purple Walrus Press Contributor Brooks Parola.

Don’t. Overreach. The vast majority of Americans are probably willing to look at serious police reform. Also, the vast majority of Americans don’t want their police forces defunded.
Should spending be focused more on education and training? Yes. Should funds geared towards militarizing be eliminated? Absolutely! And much of that money should go to increased raises and benefits to cops (hey, you get what you pay for) in exchange for serious police union accountability and reform.

PWP Contributor Brooks Parola.

Saturday, June 6, 2020

Hundreds Participate In Black Lives Matter Protest/March In Ypsilanti Saturday.

Photo Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.


By Editor in Chief & Publisher Jeff Brown.

Hundreds of demonstrators participated in a peaceful Black Lives Matter demonstration and march in downtown Ypsilanti Saturday afternoon. The protest demonstration/march demanded justice in wake of the death of George Floyd who was killed by a Minneapolis police officer on May 25, 2020.

Demonstrators in Ypsilanti carried signs reading, Black Lives Matter, Silence Is Violence, and a large banner reading Strong Communities Make Police Obsolete. There was also a sign stating, Free The Press/Journalism Is Not A Crime.

Beginning at 2:00 PM, several speakers addressed the crowd that had gathered on Michigan Ave near the downtown Ypsilanti Public Library. At approximately 3:30, the demonstrators marched down Washington Street and turned left on Washtenaw Ave, before circling back to where protesters had gathered.

Photos Jeff Brown Purple Walrus Press.